Texting and Facebook have changed dynamics of teenage dating: Ericsson
Texting and Facebook have changed the dynamics of teenage dating and the biggest changes can be seen in the courting process, where the goal is to ask the other person out on a date

The behaviour of teenagers, particularly on romantic canvass has undergone sea change with Facebook and texting defining their relationships and current status. 

 

According to a survey conducted by Ericsson ConsumerLab the common usage of texting and Facebook has changed the dynamics of teenage dating. The biggest changes can be seen in the courting process, where the goal is to ask the other person out on a date. However teenagers still meet potential romantic partners face-to-face.

 

Between June and November 2011, Ericsson ConsumerLab carried out research into what those implications will be.

 

“Behaviors are dynamic, and shift as people enter different life stages. As they get older, teenagers start to use communication tools in the same way as adults. They will continue to use ‘their’ tools such as texting, Facebook and video chat, but at the same time, they understand the need to use voice and e-mail as they move into the next stage of their lives,” said Ann-Charlotte Kornblad, Senior advisor at Ericsson ConsumerLab.

 

Another clear shift is the fact that changing your Facebook relationship status to “in a relationship” or “single” is now seen by friends as the official declaration.

 

Texting remains the teenager’s tool of choice when face time isn’t an option.  It is a tool that does not interrupt the flow of their lives. Voice calls, on the other hand, are considered by teenagers to be more suitable for adults.

 

The report finds that the ownership level for smartphones and regular mobile phones are the same for 17-year-olds, but 13-year-olds are much more interested in getting a smartphone, if they don’t already have one.


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